2017 Retirement Contribution Limits Unchanged

Retirement plan contributions are supposed to be indexed and adjusted annually in line with the change in the rate of inflation. But only in the governmental fantasy world of non-inflation are adjustments not necessary.

That is to say, in case you missed it, the contribution limits to your 401(k) plan, IRA and Roth IRA—set by the government each year based on the inflation rate—will not go up in 2017.  Just like this year, you will be able to defer up to $18,000 of your paycheck to your 401(k), and individuals over age 50 will still be able to make a “catch-up” contribution of an additional $6,000.  (The same limits apply to 403(b) plans and the federal government’s new Thrift Savings Plan.)  Your IRA and Roth IRA contributions will continue to max out at $5,500, plus a $1,000 “catch-up” contribution for persons 50 or older.

SEP IRA and Solo 401(k) contribution limits, meanwhile, will go up from $53,000 this year to $54,000 in 2017.

The government has made small changes to the income limits on who can make deductions to a Roth IRA and who can claim a deduction for their contribution to a traditional IRA.  The phaseout schedule (income range) for single filers for 2016 starts at $117,000 and contributions are entirely phased out at $132,000; for joint filers the current range is $186,000 to $196,000.  In 2017, the single phaseout will run $1,000 higher, from $118,000 to $133,000, and the joint phaseout threshold will rise $2,000, to $188,000 up to $198,000.  Single persons who have a retirement plan at work will see the income at which they can no longer deduct their IRA contributions go up $1,000 as well, with the phaseout starting at $62,000 and ending at $72,000.  Couples will see their phaseout schedule rise to $99,000 to $119,000.

If you would like to review your retirement plan options, current investment portfolio or discuss any other financial planning matters, please don’t hesitate to contact us or visit our website at http://www.ydfs.com. We are a fee-only fiduciary financial planning firm that always puts your interests first.  If you are not a client yet, an initial consultation is complimentary and there is never any pressure or hidden sales pitch. We start with a specific assessment of your personal situation. There is no rush and no cookie-cutter approach. Each client is different, and so is your financial plan and investment objectives.

Sources:

http://money.cnn.com/2016/10/27/retirement/401k-ira-contribution-2017/index.html?iid=Lead

http://www.investopedia.com/articles/retirement/111516/2017-cola-adjustments-overview.asp?partner=mediafed

The MoneyGeek thanks guest writer Bob Veres for his contribution to this post


Filed under: estate planning, Financial Planning, retirement planning Tagged: 2017 Retirement Contribution Limits

About the author

Sam Fawaz, CPA, CFP®

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