Author - Claire Emory, MBA, CFA, CFP®

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Give Your Investments Time to Grow
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Financial Planning Lessons from the Founding Fathers
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Grace and Frankie: Gray Divorce and Starting a Business
4
Millennials and Estate Planning
5
Mothers Help Children Understand Financial Planning

Give Your Investments Time to Grow

You may have heard talk of ‘helicopter parents,’ to refer to parents who won’t give their children space to grow because they are constantly hovering over them and perhaps even trying to do school assignments for them. Well, as Fee-Only financial advisor Margaret R. McDowell explains in “Don’t hover over your investments,’” you may be a ‘helicopter’ investor if you are not giving your investments time and space to grow.

As McDowell explains, all of out technological advances may be hurting our investment portfolio if we use the computer and phone apps to continuously check on our investments

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Financial Planning Lessons from the Founding Fathers

Money Lessons of America’s Founding Fathers offers the kind of financial information about our country’s early leaders that may have been missing from your history textbook. Whether you can relate to the Founding Fathers or not, you can learn from their financial planning practices (or lack thereof).

Alexander Hamilton is all the rage these days because of the hit musical about his life. It is true that he may not have been given the credit he deserved for the creativity he showed in building our nation’s financial structure but it is also true that he did better for the country …

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Grace and Frankie: Gray Divorce and Starting a Business

The Netflix show Grace and Frankie chronicles what happens when seventy-something frenemies Grace and Frankie learn that their husbands were not only partners in a law firm but also romantically involved. The two men decide they want to live out their days together so they divorce their wives.

Grace and Frankie Show Us How to Retire in Style,” financial advisor David Rae looks at lessons from the show. One is that while you can make plans, you should expect the unexpected. Retirement planning is important because you can adjust when something unexpected happens. If you have made no plans Read More

Millennials and Estate Planning

Yes, we know many Millennials don’t use paper to make lists but you get the idea–add estate planning to your to-do list.

The media spends a lot of time talking about Millennials. Experts analyze their spending habits, discuss how they will affect the economy, and sometimes chastise them for their financial planning or lack thereof. Earlier this year, NerdWallet decided to talk to this generation, saying, “Millennials, don’t forget estate planning” and noting that it is a mistake to think you can put off estate planning until you are in your 50s or 60s.

You may have heard …

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Mothers Help Children Understand Financial Planning

Some of this motherly advice connects to financial planning in a direct way; the Money article notes that high percentages of the participants in a BeFrugal.com survey say their mothers taught them to look for sales, to use coupons, and to recognize the difference between a want and a need.

But there is so much more advice children get from their mothers that does not necessarily relate directly to money and finance yet it still can guide them as have more financial resources to manage and enter the workforce. As the article suggests:

“Life lessons like “don’t be late” and

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