Author - Claire Emory, MBA, CFA, CFP®

1
Individuals and Industries Need to Work to Increase Retirement Savings
2
Getting an Education in Finance In or Outside of School
3
Guidelines for an Emergency Fund
4
Investing Lessons from a Fun Sport
5
Turn to a Fee-Only Financial Planner When You Inherit

Individuals and Industries Need to Work to Increase Retirement Savings

Earlier this year, Yahoo! Money looked at the results of the Retirement in America report from PwC and found that people in the U.S.seriously lack retirement savings. Twenty-five percent of Americans do not have any retirement savings and those that do are not saving enough. Younger people were the least likely to save for retirement, since 42% of 18-to-29-year-olds do not have any savings. Still, the 13% of people over 60 who do not have retirement savings is a cause of concern for financial experts.

An expert told Yahoo! Money that people who are saving some money for retirement might …

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Getting an Education in Finance In or Outside of School

Students in U.S. schools already had uneven access to financial education before the pandemic began last year. The fact that many school systems ended in-person learning in favor on virtual school threatened to make it even more difficult for students to get a handle on financial planning in academic setting but some schools found ways to adapt.

 CNBC.com discusses this in “The pandemic has upended personal finance education in schools.”  While one teacher they interviewed was unable to have the financial expert who usually comes in to help teach finance classes be there in person, another found it …

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Guidelines for an Emergency Fund

Perhaps you had to tap into your emergency fund during the past year or so. Or maybe the uncertainty surrounding the pandemic has you thinking that it is time to start an emergency fund. Real Simple offers “5 Rules for an Emergency Fund That Will See You Through (Almost) Anything.

You might wonder why you even need “rules” for an emergency find but guidelines can help you as you try to save enough to keep you afloat should you need it.

The conventional advice from financial experts is that your emergency fund should cover 3 to 6 months …

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Investing Lessons from a Fun Sport

In “What Pickleball Can Teach You About Investing,” Jacob Schroeder, writing for Kiplinger.com, demonstrates how you can apply everyday lessons to your investing and financial planning…if you pay attention.

Pickleball isn’t tennis but it has some things in common with tennis. In pickle ball, the players use paddles to hit a small plastic ball over a net. And if you didn’t know, pickleball is popular with retirees. There are pickleball tournaments at community centers and most players are in their golden years. The author of this article played the sport outdoors as a way to get some recreation and follow …

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Turn to a Fee-Only Financial Planner When You Inherit

When someone uses financial planning services to transfer money or assets to beneficiaries, that is a wealth transfer. Many people believe that in the United States we will see a great wealth transfer as Baby Boomers age and leave money for those who are younger. “The impact of inheritance” on Vox.com ponders whether the anticipated wealth transfer will be enough to help a number of Americans maintain middle-class status.

Author Meredith Haggerty writes, “….a transfer of wealth can be a lot of things: freeing and stifling, a relief and a burden, a windfall and a pitfall. It depends …

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