Category - Taxes

1
Will You Have to Pay Taxes on Stimulus Money?
2
How to Become Financially Fit in 2021
3
IRA and Retirement Plan Limits for 2021
4
Plan Ahead for Next Year’s Taxes
5
Planning to give to charities: should you consider a donor-advised fund?

Will You Have to Pay Taxes on Stimulus Money?

If you are someone who has received or will receive a stimulus check from the federal government, you may be concerned that you will need to pay taxes on those funds in the future. Kiplinger.com addresses that and a few other related tax issues in “Is Your Stimulus Check Taxable?” 

Although we are taxed on income, there are no taxes on the stimulus checks because “As it turns out, your stimulus check isn’t “income” after all, according to the law. Instead, it’s simply an advance payment of a tax credit. And tax credits aren’t taxable income.” This is …

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How to Become Financially Fit in 2021

by Christina Slavonik, CFP(R) Oh, yes!  It’s that time of year again! It’s time to list out resolutions or goals that we would like to accomplish this year.  There may be some “rollovers” from 2020!  One important resolution to add to your list is to be financially fit.  It’s not something that happens overnight, but […]… Read More

IRA and Retirement Plan Limits for 2021

As the year comes to and end, it is good to know the limits for 2021 contributions to IRA’s and employer retirement plans.  Many IRA and retirement plan limits are indexed for inflation each year. While some of the limits remain unchanged for 2021, other key numbers have increased.

IRA contribution limits

The maximum amount you can contribute to a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA in 2021 is $6,000 (or 100% of your earned income, if less), unchanged from 2020. The maximum catch-up contribution for those age 50 or older remains $1,000. You can contribute to both a traditional …

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Plan Ahead for Next Year’s Taxes

The Huffington Post writes, “You might still be focused on surviving 2020, but when it comes to taxes, it doesn’t hurt to plan ahead.” There are some people who plan all year and work with professionals like an accountant and a Fee-Only financial advisor. Others might start thinking about the following year’s taxes after the winter holidays.  

At the end of last month, the IRS shared changes to the tax code that will be in place for 2021. The tax brackets did not change but they did adjust the income amounts for each bracket because of inflation.

We tend to …

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Planning to give to charities: should you consider a donor-advised fund?

It hasn’t been covered much, but charitable donation deductions were almost eliminated for the middle class in the tax “reforms”. You can only deduct your charitable contributions if you decide to itemize, and your allowable itemized deductions exceed $12,000 for a single and $24,000 for married filing jointly—and remember, all state and local taxes are capped at $10,000, no matter what your property tax is. If your mortgage interest is significant or your itemized deductions will exceed these caps, your charitable deductions will still be deductible. If not, nada.

There’s one exception. For the 2020 tax year, you can separately …

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